2018 Roth IRA Contribution Limits

2018 Roth IRA Contribution Limits

We all know that we should be saving for retirement.  Whether you have a 401k, a pension, or an IRA, retirement accounts give individuals great tax breaks to help them prepare for their golden years.  It is often reported that people misjudge how much they will need in retirement.  The rule of thumb for a long time has been you need your retirement income to supplement 80% of your income when you were working; however, this number is different for everyone based on a number of factors.  One thing is certain.  Maxing out your retirement accounts never hurts.  For 2017, the IRA contribution limits stayed the same as they were in 2016.  You could contribute up to $5,500 towards your IRA, and if you were 50 or older you can contribute an additional $1,000 bringing your total yearly contribution limit to $6,500.  The 2018 Roth IRA contribution limits won’t be released until October of this year, but we can speculate what they might be.

Each year, the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) sets the income and contribution limits for IRA’s.  The last year that the IRS raise the contribution limit was for the tax year of 2013.  The contribution amounts for traditional and Roth IRA’s are the same each year.  They are evaluated and raised based on inflation.  The IRS will raise contribution limits in increments of $500.  This means that the next time they are raised, people under the age of 50 will be able to contribute a maximum of $6,000 a year to their IRA, while people over the age of 50 will be able to most likely contribute $7,000 a year.  In order for this raise in contribution limits to take place, inflation would need to be around 9% over a period of time for this to occur.

9% of $5,500 = $495

This would be near the $500 increment level the IRS would like to see to raise the contribution limits.

Since the last time the IRS raised contribution limits in 2013, inflation has risen by about 6.5% based on data tables.  This means that another 2.5% increase in inflation would be needed for the IRS to raise the contribution limits for traditional and Roth IRA’s.  With all of this being said, the most likely scenario is that 2018 Roth IRA contribution limits will remain unchanged.  A more likely scenario would be a raise in the contribution limits for 2019.

Despite the fact that the 2018 Roth IRA contribution limits won’t change, the IRS will still probably change some limits.  The limit they will change, and almost always do, is the income limits associated with eligibility for participation in IRA’s.  For 2017, the IRS raised the income phase-out limit to $118,000 for single earners and $186,000 for married, joint filling earners, raises of $1,000 and $2,000 respectively.

There are still many months to wait until the IRS reveals their 2018 Roth IRA contribution limits.  An increase in the limit would allow individuals to save an additional $500 a year in a tax-advantaged account.  Although an increase is doubtful, we can still remain hopeful.

Budget Smart, Invest Wise

Does Everyone Need An EIN?

If you’re trying to start a new company, then you are probably wondering how you go about making everything legal in the eyes of the government. While the process can be time-consuming, it all boils down to filing paperwork. One of the most important parts of starting a new business is getting an IRS tax ID application so that you can make sure that you won’t get into trouble with Uncle Sam.

Perhaps you’ve heard of the different tax IDs, such as SSN (social security number), ITIN (individual tax ID number), or EIN (employer ID number). Since you’re starting a new business, you may think that you need an EIN, but is that always the case?

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One Easy Way to Slash Taxes

Image result for lower taxes

Reduce your taxes and increase your savings.  Sounds almost a little too good to be true right?

It’s possible, it’s easy, and I just did it and so can you.

Today is the final day for you to file your taxes for this year.  Did you pay more in taxes than you would have liked?  Do you want to lower your tax bill for next year?  If so, then here is how to do it:

Increase your 401k contribution to your company’s plan.  What percentage of your salary are you contributing to your 401k currently?  Bump it up.  By increasing your pre-tax 401k contribution to your plan you are in effect reducing the amount of income you take home, thus reducing your tax burden.

I recently increased my pre-tax contribution percentage by 8%, and found that I will save roughly $1700 this year on my taxes.  It’s that simple.  Increase your savings, reduce your tax burden.  This offers 3 key benefits.

Benefit 1:

You lower the amount of taxes you will be paying for the year.

Benefit 2:

You increase the amount of savings you will have at retirement.  The more you save now, the more you will have later.

Benefit 3:

Because you don’t see the additional money you put into your 401k plan on your paycheck, you won’t spend it, and most likely you won’t miss it.

 

Budget Smart, Invest Wise

 

Tax Time

It’s that time of year when we begin collecting our W-2’s, 1099’s and other documents to prepare our tax returns.  For some of us there is reason to get excited about tax time.  Why?  A tax refund!

A couple years ago a car salesman told me that the car industry loves tax season.  Why exactly?  Because many people end up using their tax refunds to help with a down payment of a new automobile.

If you get a tax refund, you might view it as a “bonus”.  Unexpected money just fell into our lap.  We get the urge to spend this money on a luxury that we might otherwise have not been able to afford.  It’s YOUR money, do with it as you please, but I will offer some advice on how to spend your tax refund wisely:

Pay down Debt:  Instead of buying a new car with your refund, use it to pay down an existing car loan if you have one.  Make an extra payment or two to a student loan you might have.  Debt is an obligation you will  have to pay down eventually, so why not use the extra money to give you an extra step to being debt free.

Go on a Vacation:  Maybe you feel like you have worked hard, and you probably have.  Use the money, or part of the money, to treat yourself to a vacation.  The enjoyment and peace of mind you can get out of an experience far outweighs any “thing” you might want to purchase.  You will have created lasting memories.  Plus, more than likely, you will be more focused upon your return.

Just save it:  Suppose you are 25 years old and receive a tax refund of $1000.  If you used that money to open a Roth IRA or put it in a taxable brokerage account, you will be well on your way to creating future financial freedom for yourself.  Let’s use the following example: You take the $1000 and open a Roth IRA.  If you put in just $100 a month into that Roth IRA, then assuming an 8% return annually, you will have an account balance of well over $300,000 in 40 years.  Granted 40 years is a way off, but that money can help supplement your retirement.  You can also use the refund to build up an emergency fund or to contribute to a taxable brokerage account.

A tax refund is welcomed by everybody who receives one.  You worked hard last year, you paid a little more in taxes then you should have, now it’s the government’s turn to give a little back to you.  Treat yourself to that vacation you’ve been craving, or use it to help put yourself in a better financial situation at the beginning of the year.

Budget Smart, Invest Wise

The Potential Retirement Cap

In his plan for the 2016 budget, the president and his administration are seeking to disrupt the current retirement process.  A number of retirement topics were mentioned such as Social Security, the elimination of a “back door” Roth, and a cap on the amount eligible in a person’s retirement accounts.

For the subject of this post, I will discuss the president’s plan to limit the amount held in retirement accounts for an individual.  Presently, an individual can have an unlimited amount in retirement accounts.  This includes employer-sponsored 401k’s, traditional IRA’s, and Roth IRA’s.  The only limitations currently imposed on retirement accounts are the amount you can contribute.  This includes$5500 ($6500 for people over 50) for IRA’s and $18,000 ($24,000 for people over 50) for 401k plans.  These limitations are currently set so that individuals don’t stash all of their retirement savings in tax-free or tax-deferred retirement accounts.  The government has to make its money somewhere.

The 2016 budget proposal would now not only put a limit on the amount of contributions you can put into a retirement account, but also on the amount held in your various retirement accounts.  The proposed limit: $3,400,000.  For a younger person saving for future retirement, this amount might seem astronomical.  However, I am here to tell you that it is not.  Granted a lot has to happen for this limit to take effect.  It has to be voted on and passed, and then I would assume the government would adjust this number to reflect inflation, roughly 3% a year.  If, and again this is a big if, this law were to be put into place it would impact roughly 10% of 401k plan participants according to Forbes.

Example:

Take the proposed limit on retirement accounts: $3,400,000 and adjust it for inflation of 3%.  In 40 years this inflation adjustment amount would be approximately $11,000,000.

Mike is a 25 year old with $20,000 in retirement assets.  This includes an employer-sponsored 401k plan along with a Roth IRA.  Mike will contribute $18,000 a year to his 401k and get an employer match of $3,000.  He puts in $21,000 a year into his 401k.  Additionally, he contributes the maximum $5,500 into his Roth IRA every year.  Mike spreads this amount out evenly over the 12-month year.  When Mike turns 50, he contributes the new limit, $24,000 in an employer-sponsored 401k with a $3,000 match and $6500 in a Roth IRA.  Assuming Mike’s portfolio returns 10% a year, Mike will have over $15,000,000 in his retirement accounts, more than what would be allowed.  He would then have to divert some of those funds to a taxable brokerage account, or be forced to spend it.

Sure, the example of Mike listed above is an outlier.  Many of us can only dream of having so much set aside for retirement.  The fact is that some people DO!  We can agree this would be a good problem to have, but nonetheless a problem.  Are you aggressive enough with your retirement planning that you have to worry about this law possibly being passed?  I am!  And for that reason, my vote is against it.

Budget Smart, Invest Wise

What to do with Your Tax Refund

It’s that time of year when we begin collecting our W-2’s, 1099’s and other documetns to prepare our tax returns.  For some of us, including myself, we get excited about this tax time of year.  The main reason: a tax refund!

I found out last year through a car salesman that the car industry loves tax season.  The reason why?  Because many people end up using their tax refunds to help with a down payment of a new automobile.  A friend of mine last year used her tax refund to purchase a designer purse.

If you get a tax refund, you might view it as a “bonus”.  Unexpected money just fell into our lap.  We get the urge to spend this money on a luxury that we might otherwise have not been able to afford.  It’s YOUR money, do with it as you please, but I will offer some advice on how to spend your tax refund wisely:

Pay down Debt:  Instead of buying a new car with your refund, use it to pay down an existing car loan if you have one.  Make an extra payment or two to a student loan you might have.  Debt is an obligation you will  have to pay down eventually, so why not use the extra money to give you an extra step to being debt free.

Go on a Vacation:  Maybe you feel like you have worked hard, and you probably have.  Use the money, or part of the money, to treat yourself to a vacation.  The enjoyment and peace of mind you can get out of an experience far outweighs any “thing” you might want to purchase.  You will have created lasting memories.  Plus, more than likely, you will be more focused upon your return.

Just save it:  Suppose you are 25 years old and receive a tax refund of $1000.  If you used that money to open a Roth IRA or put it in a taxable brokerage account, you will be well on your way to creating future financial freedom for yourself.  Let’s use the following example: You take the $1000 and open a Roth IRA.  If you put in just $100 a month into that Roth IRA, then assuming an 8% return annually, you will have an account balance of well over $300,000 in 40 years.  Granted 40 years is a way off, but that money can help supplement your retirement.  You can also use the refund to build up an emergency fund or to contribute to a taxable brokerage account.

A tax refund is welcomed by everybody who receives one.  You worked hard last year, you paid a little more in taxes then you should have, now it’s the government’s turn to give a little back to you.  Spending our refund on cars, purses and consumer electronics is what American society has conditioned us to do with extra money.  Don’t fall into the trap of what everyone else does with his or her refund.  Use it to create a better life for yourself, for the present and the future.

Budget Smart, Invest Wise